Skip navigation

Category Archives: education

http://www.smh.com.au/national/this-is-why-finland-has-the-best-schools-20160324-gnqv9l.html

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes “For many education advocates, the arts supposedly increase test scores, generate social responsibility and turn around failing schools but research that demonstrates a causal relationship has been virtually nonexistent. Now the NY Times reports that with the opening of the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, a large-scale, random-assignment study (abstract) of school tours to the museum has determined that a strong causal relationship does in fact exist between arts education and a range of desirable outcomes. Students who, by lottery, were selected to visit the museum on a field trip demonstrated stronger critical thinking skills, displayed higher levels of social tolerance, exhibited greater historical empathy and developed a taste for art museums and cultural institutions. Moreover, most of the benefits are significantly larger for minority students, low-income students and students from rural schools — typically two to three times larger than for white, middle-class, suburban students — owing perhaps to the fact that the tour was the first time they had visited an art museum. Further research is needed to determine what exactly about the museum-going experience determines the strength of the outcomes. How important is the structure of the tour? The size of the group? The type of art presented? ‘Clearly, however, we can conclude that visiting an art museum exposes students to a diversity of ideas that challenge them with different perspectives on the human condition,’ write the authors. ‘Expanding access to art, whether through programs in schools or through visits to area museums and galleries, should be a central part of any school’s curriculum.'”

Posted via a mobile Android device.

Sorry to disagree with you, but your Apple recommendations are terrible.Remember uneducated consumers are reading this also not just Apple people.On the Air why would you tell people to buy a computer that they can not upgraded the Ram on? A computer that you can not play HD content out of unless you have a thunderbolt cable that connects to a HDMI cable, or a Thunderbolt monitor, or apple TV to air play to. A computer that has no Ethernet port???That is not something a computer should not be with out. That price just went up a few hundred dollars.The Retina for the Pro’s Really?Yea they want to Download Every Piece of professional software they use to put it on this thing. They also want to not be able to upgrade their computer when it is not keeping up with the 5 hour render/ video job they are doing. Which if they went with the Retina that would be the case.Just like the air you will have a couple hundred dollars extras to just do things the other computers can do and neither are touch screen capable. But most of the comparable PC models you suggest are.I get that digital media is the way to go these day’s but there is some software you do just not want to download, and buying a external drive is a added cost.People really need to look at Apple before they choose one right now. Unless you want a toss away computer like their iProducts, and you need the new every year model do not buy. That is the route they are going with most their Apple products. Look at other company’s and systems. or Even getting PC based laptop and making it apple if you really need it is a better choice.So any one reading this, the moral of my gripe is, do some research before you buy anything these day’s. It may seem like it meets your needs but it may not. Get more then one point of view on your purchase also.Also just so people do not assume things. I am not a Windows or Apple fan boy. I am a person that uses both in everyday life, so I know the facts and the issues that arise from these and do not like seeing consumers get the shaft.There is a reason Apple still only has 7% of the PC market which is a screwed number anyways. I would say it is maybe 4%.

Posted via a mobile Android device.

A few years ago, scientists at the Thousand Oaks biotech firm Amgen set out to double-check the results of 53 landmark papers in their fields of cancer research and blood biology.The idea was to make sure that research on which Amgen was spending millions of development dollars still held up. They figured that a few of the studies would fail the test — that the original results couldn’t be reproduced because the findings were especially novel or described fresh therapeutic approaches.But what they found was startling: Of the 53 landmark papers, only six could be proved valid.

Posted via a mobile Android device.

The way Chris Frydrych tells it, monitoring schoolkids’ public social media posts and then reporting questionable activities about them daily to school officials is an unquestionable net positive.

So his new startup, Geo Listening, does just that. Geo Listening looks for social media posts that deal with depression, despair, online bullying, hate speech, or other words and phrases that may indicate a possible violation of school codes of conduct—whether it’s by a student or someone in and around a school’s location.

Posted via a mobile Android device.

Some academic institutions in UK have come under fire for spying on their students’ private data – a move that they say was designed to improve education standards.

Posted via a mobile Android device.

Once you’ve installed the extension in Chrome, clicking and holding on any word on any webpage will open up a sidebar full of related links, images, videos, news articles, and map locations. If you want to expand your search to an entire phrase, you can drag the grab handles on the ends of your selection to add more words to the query. While not exactly revolutionary, Kikin is a very slick solution to an all-too-common web task, and it’s certainly worth checking out.

Posted via a mobile android device.

In 2006 the U.S. was at war in Iraq. Some of the enemy forces it very much struggled to fight against were coming in through Syria. The same year Israel lost a war against Hizbullah. Its armored forces were ambushed whenever they tried to push deeper into Lebanon while Hizbullah managed to continuously fire rockets against Israeli army position and cities. Hizbullah receives supply for its missile force from Syria and from Iran through Syria. Its long-term plans to attack Iran and to thereby keep supremacy in the Middle East depend on severing Hizbullah’s supply routes. The sectarian Sunni Gulf countries, mainly Saudi Arabia, saw their Sunni brethren defeat in Iraq and a Shia government, supported by Iran, taking over the country. All these countries had reason to fight Syria. There were also economic reasons to subvert an independent Syria. A gas pipeline from Qatar to Turkey was competing with one from Iran to Syria. Large finds of natural gas in the coastal waters of Israel and Lebanon make such finds in Syrian waters quite plausible.

Posted via a mobile android device.

Over the past three decades, American colleges and universities have been supersized. There are more students paying more money (financed by more financial aid and debt) to attend college. They are spending the best four years of their life at colleges that – for the most part – have expanding budgets that fund more and more programs and facilities.

Rising costs combined with increased enrollments – due to a demographic bump and people going to school to ride out the recession – has led total student debt to rise to around $1 trillion, with$150 billion owed to private lenders and the rest owed to the Federal government. The New York Fed estimates that debt nearly tripled from $363 billion in early 2005 to $966 billion at the end of 2012.

Posted via a mobile android device.

Google’s big list of open source projectsjust grew by one — the company has introduced a new online learning platform called MOOC.org. Despite the name, it’s not a website about cows — MOOC stands for “massive open online courses,” and it’s a product of the marriage between Mountain View andedX, an educational website by MIT and Harvard. However, while edX only features free courses from affiliated universities, MOOC.org will accept material submitted by other institutions, governments, businesses and even individuals. In short, just about anyone can pitch in — edX’s president even revealed that they want the site to eventually become the “YouTube for MOOCs.” The companies have yet to reveal how they’ll screen submitted courses for quality and how contributors can earn money, but we’ll likely find out when the site launches in mid-2014. Self-motivated folks eager to learn will have to hang out around libraries, campuses and TED talks until then.

Posted via a mobile android device.