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Monthly Archives: July 2013

Are you able to get into your office by simply bumping your purse or wallet against a reader? Then your office is using radio-frequency identification cards, or RFID cards, to manage building access and security.

And those RFID cards are vulnerable — now more than ever before, thanks to an invention by security professional Fran Brown that can read RFID cards from a distance and copy their data. Click for rest of article.

http://rt.com/news/obese-african-zealand-expulsion-711/

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/cnet/JhqR/~3/wI7nfzzZ9MU/

http://lifehacker.com/eat-tomatoes-to-guard-against-sun-damage-929036540

http://lifehacker.com/5852572/how-to-read-and-utilize-body-language-to-reveal-the-truth-in-almost-any-situation

http://www.esquire.com/_mobile/blogs/mens-fashion/life-without-deodorant-10-day-washout?click=pp

http://www.pcworld.com/article/2045220/chromecast-at-home-in-the-boardroom-as-well-as-the-living-room.html

Chromecast

http://lifehacker.com/swell-is-like-pandora-for-news-ted-talks-comedy-and-915858465

http://rt.com/usa/bee-pesticide-scientist-research-600/

 

The Science Behind How We Learn New Skills

 

Learning new skills is one of the best ways to make yourself both marketable and happy, but actually doing so isn’t as easy as it sounds. The science behind how we learn is the foundation for teaching yourself new skills. Here’s what we know about learning a new skill.

Our brains are still a bit of a mystery. We’ll likely be learning about how our brain works for years to come, but we are starting to get a better idea of how we learn new things. To that end, let’s start by talking about what happens in your brain as you take on a new skillset before moving onto some of the scientifically effective ways to learn.

Click here for rest of article